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Balogh / Nagy Open House

There will be an open house at this unique home on August 9th. Tickets for the 2 PM or 3 PM event are $15 and may be obtained at http://www.a2modern.myevent.com/ .

Think of a 90° angle tilted left 15° and you have the framework for this 1968 house. “With limited resources we certainly got an unusually interesting house,” says Andrew Nagy, who with his then-wife Joan Nagy, hired modern architect Tivadar (usually called Tiv) Balogh to design a house on a lot that they had purchased in Huron River Heights.

Neither of the Nagy’s had much experience with houses—Joan was just 22 and Andrew had always lived in apartments, so they were open to new ideas. “When he [Balogh] said he had always wanted to build a trapezoidal house we said ‘why not?’ We loved the way the house turned out,” says Joan. Balogh had been in private practice just six years when he accepted the Nagy commission in 1967. Prior to that, he had worked six years as a draftsman for Robert Metcalf, another U-M architecture school graduate who was also a modernist.

The Nagy’s developed a close working relationship with Balogh, who they came to admire and like. After tweaking the plan to their liking, Balogh oversaw the construction. At first the Nagy’s did not think they needed eating areas in both the kitchen and dining room, but Balogh convinced them otherwise. “He said his kids were in the ‘food throwing stage’ and that a separate area was needed,” recalls Andrew. The plan had an option for a copper roof, but that turned out to be equal to the cost of the rest of the house, so they substituted cedar shakes.

Balogh achieved both privacy and light for the house by having the roof go all the way to the ground on the driveway side and putting large windows on the front and back. The Nagy’s loved the fireplace that Balogh designed for them. Made with Chicago common brick, which are smaller and a lighter color than traditional ones, it’s the focal point of the living room and goes up two stories.

In the ten years they were in the house, the Nagy’s made only one major change, which was to enclose the balcony in their bedroom. Joan liked being able to see out part of the living room windows, but when their children got to the age when they liked to jump on the bed, both Nagy’s worried about whether it was safe.

When the Nagy’s needed more room they thought of adding on but found it too expensive, so they hired a builder to construct another house for them. They were able to replicate the fireplace in their new home, but other features like the vertical grained wood doors and tongue in groove cedar proved to be too expensive by then.

Kelly Salchow MacArthur, the present owner with her husband Jay MacArthur, has the same positive opinion of the house that the Nagy’s had. “It’s mid-century but not low and flat,” she says, adding “I like the angles, the way the rooflines affect the rooms. I love the interesting way the built-in shelves mimic the outside proportions.” She and Jay have kept the modern look by not over furnishing the house, an endeavor helped by the fact that there are many built-ins. For new furniture they have focused on the classics such as Eames and Bertoia. Kelly’s design work hangs throughout the house. Be sure and note the mailbox in front of the driveway that she designed to relate to the house.

 

.written by Grace Shackman

 


New David Osler Tour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Sunday afternoon, May 3rd, there will be three tours of the Oslund condominiums here in Ann Arbor.

The cost of the tour is $15 per person. To register click here: http://www.a2modern.myevent.com/

Oslund was David Osler’s most personal work after his house and office. Located on what had been
his family’s farm, he cared deeply about the site and was in total control of the design. The resulting
project, 27 condominiums built in three phases between 1987–2005, was designed for clustered
density, yet each unit is totally private. “He did Oslund for himself, it was a whole different concept,”
recalls Connie Osler, David Osler’s widow.

Osler (1921–2014) moved with his family to the farm when he was four years old. When the
Depression hit they were able to survive by supplementing his father’s income as county agricultural
agent with the farm produce. Scott Van Sweringen, the architect who was project manager on the
first phase, remembers that by the time they began the project “the land was mainly scrub grown
over, but we looked to see if there were trees to save.” They did find some birches that were
incorporated into internal gardens and still are there. They also saved pine trees that Osler and his
brother Scott had planted.

The units in the first phase are entered through the first of the three gardens, into a low entrance,
leading past a galley kitchen, into a cozy dining room that looks out onto the second garden, and
then up three steps to an elegant high-ceiling living room surrounded with a garden on two sides.
Helen Aminoff, long time Osler business manager and a resident in one of the first phase condos,
describes the units as “opening up like a flower,” to which Molly Osler, Osler’s daughter, adds, “you
experience it as a series of events.”

Minor changes were made in the second phase units including moving the location of the stairs to
the basement thus creating a larger kitchen and removing the steps to the living room, a request
from people interested in aging in place.

The condos were carefully designed to fit the site. The steep-roofed garages, which front the units,
are in a stepped-up pattern following the rise of the land. “It’s more interesting than if they were just
lined up,” says Van Sweringen. The basements were dug and then the ground filled back in for the
gardens. Because of the various stages of the projects, Van Sweringen recalls that they had to call a
surveyor in several times, and adds “the visual interest came with a  price.”

Privacy also was carefully thought out. “You can’t see into windows, they are visually restricted, it
took great effort to do this,” explains John Miller, builder on the last two phases. “The gardens
extend the living space,” explains Jim Scrivens, the architect who was project manager for the
second and third phases. “With the high density, they needed outside space to look out at, plus
it created natural light.” The three gardens are enclosed by high brick walls, making window
blinds unnecessary.

The design of the gardens was left to the residents and varied from rose gardens to vegetable ones
and everything in between. Some people put in decks. One requested a sunken pool. The plants for
the exterior landscape, Amur maples and ground cover and shrubs, were selected by landscape
architect Chuck Cares. The two roads were named Scott, after Osler’s brother, and Young, his
mother’s maiden name.

The “os” in the name is of course from Osler (pronounced with a long o), while “lund” is the Swedish
word for wooded glen. The Scandinavian influence is most noticeable in the painted white brick and
the internal gardens. “They had beautiful little towns,” recalled Osler in a 2012 interview. “The
buildings were simple, straight forward. I learned a tremendous amount.” In the same interview he
said of Oslund that he particularly liked the “angles and gables, creating sharp shadows,” adding, “I
love it when it’s crisp.”

The units in the first phase were the hardest to sell. “Those who could afford them were used to
more conventional houses and had trouble seeing themselves in that environment,” recalls Van
Sweringen, “while younger people liked it but they didn’t have the money.” The worsening economy
added to the troubles, as did problems with visualizing the final product which potential buyers had
to imagine from models and house plans. Complaints included the lack of a picture window in front,
the size of the galley kitchen, and the lack of a long view. But those with imagination could order
finishes they wanted. One wanted stone floors throughout, others wanted different fireplaces. The
space above the garage was left unfinished so each occupant could decide its use such as office,
exercise room, art studio, or guest bedroom.

In the second phase, because they were pre-sold but could see the finished products in the earlier
phase, a number of changes were made on request such as moving walls to give a more open
feel, changing the kitchen layout, and basement finishes. Because of the city’s desire for a smaller
footprint and the lay of the land, Osler was able to design the phase three units as two stories, some
with an exposed basement, allowing more daylight into that area.

Today the units sell almost as soon as they hit the market, often at prices higher than the listing.
Photo: Courtesy of Bentley Historical Library.

 

 

 


Docomomo US National Symposium 2015: Modernism on the Prairie

Docomo will sponsor the third annual National Symposium on Modernism in Minneapolis from Thursday, June 04, 2015 8:00 AM to Sunday, June 07, 2015 9:00 PM (Central Time).

The three-and-a-half-day symposium seeks to celebrate and bring national attention to the unique cultural heritage, preservation, and advocacy of significant modern architecture and landscape architecture throughout the state of Minnesota. The symposium will include a multifaceted schedule of events featuring: peer reviewed presentations, panel discussions, exclusive tours , and networking events.

As the only national event working to explore and build consensus on the preservation of Modernism, the symposium will bring together world renowned designers, scholars, students, and professionals from the state of Minnesota and from around the country.

 

For more information go to http://www.docomomo-us-symposium.com/


2015 Michigan Modernism Exposition

 

This event will take place on
Friday, April 24, 7pm-10pm
Charge: advance ticket, $75 available online at daads.org
Location: Southfield Civic Center, 26000 Evergreen Road, Southfield, MI 48076

It’s part of a ten day to salute Michigan’s contributions to the Modern Movement which takes place April 16 – 25, 2015. For more information check out

DetroitModernismWeek.com

 


Fenton Community and Cultural Center

There will be a preview tour on Saturday, March 14th from 1:00 – 3:00 PM, of the newly expanded Fenton Community and Cultural Center. The center, originally designed by Eliel Saarinen and his son, Eero, first opened in 1938. Click on the link below for details.

Final Fenton Flyer

 

 


Birkerts at the Bentley Historical Library

“One of the great American Modern architects of the last sixty years,” is how Sally Bund describes the man whose papers she has been curating at the Bentley Historical Library for the last twenty years, working closely with him. She will give an overview of Birkerts’ work, which is international in scope, including most recently the Latvian National Library. She will be joined by Margaret Leary, retired director of the University of Michigan Law Library, who was involved in the planning and design of Birkerts’ pathfinding underground addition.

Birkerts follows no set of rules but designs every building for its specific site and use. He is particularly well-known for his innovative and sensitive use of light, which is well-demonstrated in his two Ann Arbor buildings, the University Reformed Church (with its indirect lighting) and the University of Michigan Law School Library Addition (which is filled with light despite being below ground).

The Bentley Historical Library is located at 1150 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor on the University of Michigan’s North Campus. A map is attached, indicating the locations of the closest lots where free parking is available. Please contact Grace Shackman by email at gmshackman@comcast.net or by phone at 734-662-2187 if you would like any additional information.

Date/Time
Date(s) – 02/04/2015
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

 


Nancy Marie Deromedi

Nancy DeromediWe are deeply saddened to post that Nancy Deromedi, one of the founders of a2Modern, passed away at home on Oct 13 at age 52 after saying her good-byes to her loving family and close friends.  She had bravely waged a year-long fight with esophageal cancer.  She made her mark on those who worked with her and who shared her passion for Ann Arbor’s rich legacy of mid-century modernism architecture, and she will be deeply missed.

Nancy was born in Wyandotte, Michigan on November 9, 1961, the daughter of Jerry Allen and Gaye Kathleen Skinner.   She earned a business management degree at Ferris State in 1983 and pursued a career in retail clothing, arriving in Ann Arbor in 1986 to open a Laura Ashley store.   On November 17, 1990 she married David Deromedi and decided to make another change in her life by returning to school to study history at the University of Michigan.  Her future career was decided when she took a seminar in Michigan history from Francis Blouin, then Director of the Bentley Historical Library, which led to her great interest in using archival evidence of the past.

Nancy earned a B.A. from the School of Literature, Science and the Arts, and a Masters Degree from the School of Information.  She started working at the Bentley as an assistant archivist in 1997, rising through the ranks and was recently appointed Associate Director for Curation.  She was an expert curator of digital archives, designing a series of new and consequential best practices for preserving complex digital collections including the curation of digital archives from Governor Jennifer Granholm and University of Michigan President James J. Duderstadt, as well as the secure preservation of the University’s essential administrative records from its executive offices.

Nancy DeromediHer innovative ideas for solving some of the profession’s most complicated challenges were awarded support by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Historic Records and Publications Commission, and the University of Michigan Information and Technology Services.  Her work inspired a new publication series of the Society of American Archivists, entitled Campus Case Studies, and her reputation led to invitations to present at professional conferences as far away as Beijing, Copenhagen, Paris, Vienna, and throughout the U.S.  She was also a regular guest lecturer with the School of Information, the Society of American Archivists, Midwest Archives Conference, and others.

Her interest in mid-century modern architecture led to her contributions to the cultivation of important design collections for the Bentley from architects Robert Metcalf and David Osler, whose works, along with those of George Brigham, an earlier architect who was instrumental in introducing modern architecture to Ann Arbor, were recently featured at the University of Michigan Museum of Art in the exhibition series and symposium Three Michigan Architects:  Osler, Metcalf, and Brigham.

Nancy was a person of wide interests who sought to incorporate what she learned into how she lived, including with respect to her appreciation of history, art, architecture, design, gardening, and landscape. She loved spending time at her family’s restored 1830’s log house on the natural beauty of Pelee Island, Ontario.  While residing in an Old West Side arts and craft house, she researched the many aspects of this architectural and design style, collected furniture and pottery of the era, created a period correct landscape, and used her many travels as an opportunity to further her knowledge.

Nancy’s deep interest in Ann Arbor’s contributions to modernism took hold when, while browsing in the Bentley’s stacks during breaks, she learned about George Brigham.  Nancy and David purchased the Brigham designed “Leslie and Mary White” home in 2005 and then worked with Robert Metcalf, who had assisted Brigham when the home was originally built in 1950, to make restorations.  This project evolved into her ongoing research and discovery of the amazing stock of mid-century houses in her neighborhood and throughout Ann Arbor, and the architects who designed them, and her development of a deep passion for mid-century design throughout the world.

In 2010 Nancy, along with other interested homeowners and local historians, founded a2Modern, with the goal of raising the awareness and preservation of Ann Arbor’s legacy of modern architecture and design.  Recruiting others with like interests, in a short time she helped make the organization the magnet for everyone interested in this style, publishing a map of mid-century modern houses in Ann Arbor, organizing walks, field trips, house tours, and lectures, developing this website, as well as working with Eastern  Michigan University historic preservation students.  She was pleased last fall when she was able to get non-profit status for the organization.

In addition to her husband David and parents, she is survived by her siblings Jeffrey Allen Skinner (and wife Mio) of Osaka, Japan and Patricia Skinner- Smudz, (and husband Alan) of Monroe, MI,  parents in-law, Herb and Marilyn Deromedi of Mt. Pleasant, MI, sister-in-law Lori Deromedi  of Ann Arbor,  brother and sister-in-law Thomas and Lyndia Deromedi , of Linden, MI, and loving nieces and nephews Matthew, Anne, and Jessica Smudz , Noah and Ian Deromedi, and Kai and Riki Haiden-Skinner.

A memorial service will be held at the First Presbyterian Church, Ann Arbor on November 7, 2014 at 10:30 a.m. with a reception at the Ann Arbor City Club immediately following.

In lieu of flowers the family has requested memorial contributions to the Matthaei Botanical Gardens (www.lsa.umich.edu/mbg) or Arbor Hospice (www.arborhospice.org).


David W. Osler obituary

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David Osler, David William 1/9/1921 – 9/8/2014 David W.Osler of Ann Arbor MI, a prominent architect, died peacefully at 1:00 pm, September 8, surrounded by his family. Born and raise in Ann Arbor, he spent most of his childhood at the family home on Glazier Way. He graduated from University High School in 1938 where he met Connie Lorch, the young lady who would become his wife, for sixty-eight years this July. He attended the University of Michigan, studying design and illustration, graduating in 1942, with the goal of becoming a commercial artist. He was a three time letter-winner in golf and was part of a Big Ten championship golf team. Following his time at Michigan, Osler enlisted in the Navy and served on the USS Thomas Jefferson, an assault transport ship. He commanded 5 landing craft, transporting troops of the 116th regiment, 29th division during the first wave of the assault on Omaha Beach, D-Day 70 years ago. After returning from WWII, he decided a career in architecture could fulfill his need for creative and artistic expression. He founded David W. Osler Associates in 1958, housing the firm in the historic Washtenaw Light & Power sub-station (1902) at 916 Fuller Rd., Ann Arbor, after an extensive renovation.

Over the course of a 50 year career Osler compiled a diverse portfolio of building types including domestic, institutional, commercial, and civic commissions. The firm won 22 honor awards and in 2005, won the architectural Firm Award from the American Institute of Architects, (AIA) Michigan. He was a finalist out of 1,420 entries in the design competition for the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington D.C. In 1996 Osler was awarded the Michigan Gold Medal, the highest honor of the AIA. He was elevated to the College of Fellows of the AIA in 1981, a lifetime honor bestowed for design excellence and contributions to the profession. He served as a juror and adjunct professor for the Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. He also served the American Institute of Architects as president of the Huron Valley chapter, secretary to the state organization and for three years, as a member of the National Committee on Design in Washington D.C. Additionally, he was a board member of the Washtenaw Historical Commission and spent nine years as a board member of the Washtenaw Metropolitan Planning Commission.

From December of 2013 through March of 2014, Osler’s work was featured in an exhibit at the University of Michigan Museum of Art, entitled, “Three Michigan Architects: Part 1 – David Osler,” co-curated by Joe Rosa, Director, UMMA, and Nancy Bartlett, Head of the University Archives. Affiliations include the Ann Arbor Rotary Club as president in 1989, the graduate letter-winners “M” Club, as president in 1968, Ann Arbor Golf & Outing Club, the Vice President’s Club (VP’s) of Ann Arbor. Osler retired in 2010. The Bentley Historical Library wrote in its biography of David Osler, “He leaves a legacy of design elegance and simplicity that has inspired his followers with his commitment to a high quality of community life through architecture.” Osler and his wife Connie have three children, Molly, Robin, and Peter, all of whom have chosen careers in design. He is survived by his wife Connie (Constance), daughters Molly Osler of Ann Arbor, Robin Osler (Bruce Matthews) of New York, NY, Peter (Betsy Williams), of Ann Arbor, grandchildren Zane and Wren, sister Priscilla O. Cook (Mrs. William) of Bellevue, WA and two nieces, Tandy & Carrie and nephew Wyatt. Burial will be private at Botsford Cemetery. A celebration of his life will be held Saturday, October 18, at 1 pm, First Presbyterian Church, Ann Arbor. Photo credited to the Detroit News
- See more at: http://obits.mlive.com/obituaries/annarbor/obituary.aspx?n=david-william-osler&pid=172493057#sthash.cfmuHjxB.dpuf

The family has asked that memorial gifts go to Hospice of Michigan or a2modern. To make a donation in David Osler’s memory to a2modern, please send a check to a2modern, p.o. 7631, ann arbor, michigan 48107. The mission of a2modern is to raise the awareness and appreciation of modern architecture and design. Questions about a2modern, email modernists@a2modern.org.


Three Michigan Architects: Osler, Metcalf, and Brigham / a Symposium on their Domestic Architecture in Ann Arbor

You are invited to a symposium of “Three Michigan Architects” on their Domestic Architecture in Ann Arbor

See full program with images: http://umma.umich.edu/insider/3ma-symposium

Sunday, October 5
2:00pm–6:00pm
​Helmut Stern Auditorium

The exhibition series Three Michigan Architects: Osler, Metcalf, and Brigham comes to its conclusion with a symposium that brings together faculty from the U-M School of Architecture and Urban Planning with leading figures from UMMA and the Bentley Historical Library. Learn more about the current installment, Three Michigan Architects: Part 3–George Brigham.

SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

2:00pm–3:30pm: Session I – Contextualizing the Modern Houses of Ann Arbor​

Session I explores the wider importance of this circle of Ann Arbor-based architects, situating their regional body of domestic work into the larger context of modern architecture in the U.S. that developed on the East Coast and West Coast from the 1930s–1980.

Keynote Speaker: Joseph Rosa (UMMA)

Panel: : Doug Kelbaugh, Monica Ponce de Leon, Robert Beckley (Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning)​

Moderator: Claire Zimmerman (Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning)

3:30pm–4:30pm: Reception with refreshments, UMMA Commons​

4:30pm–6:00pm: Session II – Preservation, Restoration, and Revival of the Modern Houses of Ann Arbor​

Session II examines the role of the archive in preserving the architectural legacy of these architects and informing efforts at restoration and revival.

Keynote speaker: Nancy Bartlett (Bentley Historical Library)

Panel: Nancy Deromedi (Bentley Historical Library), Greg Saldaña, Craig Borum (Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning)

Moderator: Claire Zimmerman (Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning)

The exhibition Three Michigan Architects: Part 3 – George Brigham will be open for viewing until 6:30 pm.

More information about the symposium participants (in alpha order):

NANCY BARTLETT
Nancy Bartlett is Associate Director for Academic Programs and Collections Development at the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. She has authored a volume on the history of the University of Michigan A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, entitled More Than A Handsome Box: Education in Architecture at the University of Michigan, 1876-1986. An advocate of architectural archives, she secured several of the modernist architects’ collections at the Bentley Historical Library.


ROBERT BECKLEY

Robert Beckley was Dean of the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning from 1987 to 1997. Prior to that he was a Professor, Chair, Acting Dean, and Research Scientist in the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a school he helped found. For over a decade he was also a principal in the award-winning firm Beckley-Myers, Architects in Milwaukee. He has just published his first novel, The Architect’s Suicide: a fictional account.

CRAIG BORUM
Craig Borum is a Professor at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and the founding principal at PLY Architecture in Ann Arbor, Michigan, which he established in 1999 as a collaborative design studio seeking to strike a balance between client commissions, funded research, and design competitions. PLY is both a professional practice and an extension of his role as designer, maker, thinker and educator. Through PLY, his creative practice and design research have garnered considerable accolades for outstanding design quality, an inventive use of common materials, and dynamic award winning projects deeply rooted in the context from which they emerge. His work continues to explore the interdependent relationships of architecture and site, and the intersection of geometry and materiality. In 2012 he completed the restoration of Metcalf’s Crane Residence. He is currently working on the restoration and renovations at 3 Metcalf houses (Forsythe, Elliott and Akil/Watson) in Ann Arbor, Osler’s Fosdick House and Brigham’s Levinthal House.

NANCY DEROMEDI
Nancy Deromedi is Associate Director for Curation at the Bentley Historical Library, where she oversees all curation activities, and is one of the founders of a2modern. Her interest in Ann Arbor’s contributions to modernism took hold when she and her husband, David, purchased the Brigham-designed “Leslie and Mary White” home in 2005 and worked with Robert Metcalf on the home’s renovations. In 2010, Nancy and Tracy Aris, a fellow Brigham homeowner, along with other interested homeowners and local historians founded the architectural history group a2modern to raise the awareness and preservation of modern architecture and design in Ann Arbor. Nancy has collaborated with Grace Shackman on “Modern in Ann Arbor” Atomic Ranch, Winter 2012 and “Birth of the Cube Farm” Ann Arbor Observer, June 2014. a2modern has also published a detailed map of 86 selected residential properties in the Ann Arbor hills/Arboretum/Geddes area.

DOUGLAS KELBAUGH
Douglas Kelbaugh, Professor and former Dean of the University of Michigan’s Taubman College, was principal in Kelbaugh and Lee from 1977 to 1985, an architecture firm that won 15 design awards and competitions while pioneering passive solar design. As Chair of the Architecture Department at the University of Washington and principal in Kelbaugh, Calthorpe Associates, he edited The Pedestrian Pocket Book and authored Common Place: Toward Neighborhood and Regional Design and Repairing the American Metropolis. He co-edited The Michigan Debates on Urbanism in 2005 and Writing Urbanism in 2008. While on leave in 2008 -2010, he was Executive Director of Design and Planning in a Dubai-based development company with projects throughout the Eastern Hemisphere.


MONICA PONCE DE LEON

Monica Ponce de Leon was appointed Dean and Eliel Saarinen Collegiate Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning of University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning in September 2008. In 1991, she co-founded Office dA and in 2011 launched her own design practice; Monica Ponce de Leon Studio. She joined the Harvard Graduate School of Design faculty in 1996, where she was a Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Digital Lab. She has also held teaching appointments at Northeastern University, the Southern California Institute of Architecture, Rhode Island School of Design and Georgia Institute of Technology among others. Her practice has received over 60 design awards including the AIA’s Institute Honor Award for Architecture (Macallen Building, 2010), Honor Award for Design Excellence, AIA New York Chapter (200 West Street Project Team (including Office dA), 2010), Wallpaper Design Awards Best New Restaurant (Banq, 2009), the AIA/LA Design Award (Helios House, 2007), the AIA/ALA Library Building Award (Fleet Library at RISD, 2007), the AIA/Committee on the Environment’s Top Ten Green Projects (Macallen Building, 2008), five I.D. Magazine Annual Design Review Awards and eight Progressive Architecture Awards.

JOSEPH ROSA
Joseph Rosa is Director of the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA), a position he has held since July 2010. At the University, Rosa also chairs the President’s Advisory Committee on Public Art and is a Professor of Architecture at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. Prior to his arrival at the University of Michigan, Rosa was the John H. Bryan Curatorial Chair of Architecture and Design at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Helen Hilton Raiser Curator of Architecture and Design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Curator of Architecture at the Heinz Architectural Center at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, PA, the Chief Curator at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC, and the Director of the Columbia Architecture Galleries. Rosa is a prolific author, with 16 books as well as numerous articles and essays to his credit. His research addresses modern architecture and the representation of architecture through photograph, film, and the design arts. His body of work as a curator also spans historical to contemporary architecture, with a focus on bringing emerging issues in architecture to the general public as well as repositioning historical figures through a contemporary framework. Over his career he has curated 50 exhibitions.

GREGORY SALDANA
Gregory Saldaña teaches masters and post professional documentation and architectural preservation courses at Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning. His research is focused on the preservation of modern architecture in the American cultural context, with a particular interest in industrial and regional influences. Since joining the faculty in 2009, he has curated exhibitions addressing the history and speculative future of modern architecture, including: Modernism at Risk / Michigan Matters, Constructing Modern: The Work of Robert C. Metcalf, and most recently Michigan Modern: Design That Shaped America hosted by Cranbrook Art Museum. Saldaña received his BFA and BARCH from the Rhode Island School of Design, and a Master of Science in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of MPdL Studio, an architecture firm with offices in Ann Arbor, Boston, and New York City.


CLAIRE ZIMMERMAN

Claire Zimmerman is Associate Professor of History of Art and at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. She teaches courses on 19th- and 20th-century European and American architecture with research emphases on architectural media and industrialization. She is currently curating an exhibition at Tate Britain, opening November 2014 and entitled New Brutalist Image 1949-1955 with Victoria Walsh, Royal College of Art, London. Zimmerman’s book Photographic Architecture in the Twentieth Century (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) joins a co-edited essay collection, Neo-avant-garde and Postmodern: Postwar Architecture in Britain and Beyond (with Mark Crinson) that appeared as Volume 21 in the Yale Studies in British Art (Yale University Press) in fall 2010. An earlier monograph, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was published by Taschen in 2006.
Three Michigan Architects: Osler, Metcalf, and Brigham is part of the U-M Collections Collaborations series, which showcases the renowned and diverse collections of the University of Michigan. This series inaugurates UMMA’s collaboration with the Bentley Historical Library and is generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Lead support for Three Michigan Architects is provided by the University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research.
This symposium is made possible by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research.
Top left image: David Osler, Architect, Mundus Residence exterior, Ann Arbor, MI, 1978; Greg Hursley, Photographer; Courtesy of the University of Michigan Bentley Historical Library Top middle: Robert C. Metcalf, Architect, Metcalf Residence exterior, Ann Arbor, MI, 1952-1953, Photograph by Galbraith Photography, Courtesy of the U-M Bentley Historical Library Bottom middle: Robert C. Metcalf, c. 1960. Image courtesy of the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Top right: George B. Brigham, Architect, Hazen Residence exterior, Ann Arbor, MI, 1949, Courtesy of the U-M Bentley Historical Library


Last walking tour for 2014, Sunday September 14th-SOLD OUT!

map

Join us for the last walking tour of the year. The tour will be Sunday September 14th from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30.
Ann Arbor Walking Tour III Sunday, September 14, 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

This event has limited space availability. Cost: $10/person. Registration is required.

This walking tour will look at several modern homes located in one area of Ann Arbor Hills. The tour will view the exteriors of homes designed by Robert Metcalf, William Muschenheim, Edward Olencki and Joe Albano and David Osler. It will provide a historical overview of the area and will include an interior view of the Robert and Bettie Metcalf residence (1952). The walking tour will be lead by Nancy Deromedi and Grace Shackman.

a2modern is a local 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to the awareness of and appreciation for mid-century architecture and design, celebrating the accomplishments of the architects, designers, builders and homeowners in Ann Arbor. UMMA is pleased to partner with a2modern to provide audiences the opportunity to experience Ann Arbor’s modernist architecture in conjunction with the exhibition Three Michigan Architects: Part 3—George Brigham on view July 19 –October 12, 2014.

The exhibition Three Michigan Architects: Part 3—George Brigham is part of the U-M Collections Collaborations series, co-organized by and presented at UMMA and designed to showcase the renowned and diverse collections at the University of Michigan.

LOGISTICS: We will meet in front of 910 Heather Way. You can park on both sides of the street.

Questions? email modernists@a2modern.org